RAHS AGM in 1919 – The impact of the influenza

In the extraordinary times of COVID-19 that we presently find ourselves, adjustments have had to be made to how we maintain safe social distancing. As our members would be aware, the Royal Australian Historical Society Annual General Meeting was held in a novel way this year – via Zoom video conferencing. Given these circumstances, you may be wondering, how was the AGM held in 1919 during the ‘Spanish flu’ pandemic? The following is an extract from The Daily Telegraph, dated … Read More

Anzac Day 1918: Different, but not forgotten

An Australian flag laid on the grass surrounding the memorial at Villers-Bretonneux. Photograph by Marie-Paule Bonte, 2020.

Written by Elizabeth Heffernan, RAHS volunteer The twice-a-day Amiens train rattles into Villers-Bretonneux station, dead autumn leaves swept to the sides of the platform and rusted overpass looming above the tracks. The small, French village is silent, cobbled streets empty in the early morning gloom. Google Maps points the way past the houses and into the fields beyond; the path laid out before us is slippery with mud and wet cut grass. Fresh rain promises. It is three kilometres from … Read More

Archive Fever – La Trobe University Podcast

Archive Fever is a new Australian history podcast featuring intimate conversations with writers, artists, curators, fellow historians and other victims of the research bug. Each episode, co-hosts Clare Wright and Yves Rees talk to archive addicts about what kind of archives they use, how often they use them, and when they got their first hit. All nine episodes of season one are now online, featuring discussions with Chloe Hooper, Tony Birch, Gwenda Taven, Jack Serong, Billy Griffiths, Rachel Buchanan, Paul … Read More

Oodgeroo Noonuccal (1920-1993)

Written by Elizabeth Heffernan, RAHS Volunteer To celebrate Women’s History Month in 2020, the Royal Australian Historical Society will continue our work from last year to highlight Australian women that have contributed to our history in various and meaningful ways. You can browse the women featured on our webpage, Women’s History Month. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this webpage contains the images and names of people who have passed away. Activist, educator, environmentalist, and the first Aboriginal … Read More

Annie Lock (1876-1943)

Written by Dr Catherine Bishop, Macquarie University To celebrate Women’s History Month in 2020, the Royal Australian Historical Society will continue our work from last year to highlight Australian women that have contributed to our history in various and meaningful ways. You can browse the women featured on our webpage, Women’s History Month. ‘A crank’ and ‘a damn fool’ were two of the epithets applied to missionary Annie Lock in the late 1920s. ‘Missionary heroine’ and ‘Big Boss to the … Read More

Shirley Coleen Smith (1921-1998)

Mum Shirl (Mrs Shirley Smith) speaking at the Australia Day ceremony at the Aboriginal Tent Embassy in front of Old Parliament House, Canberra, 26 January 1998 / Loui Seselja [Image courtesy National Library of Australia, NL38352]

Written by Elizabeth Heffernan, RAHS Volunteer To celebrate Women’s History Month in 2020, the Royal Australian Historical Society will continue our work from last year to highlight Australian women that have contributed to our history in various and meaningful ways. You can browse the women featured on our webpage, Women’s History Month. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this webpage contains the images and names of people who have passed away. Known as Mum Shirl among the Aboriginal … Read More

Daphne Mayo (1895-1982)

Daphne Mayo working on the Brisbane City Hall tympanum, c. 1930 [Image courtesy University of Queensland Fryer Library, UQFL119]

Written by Elizabeth Heffernan, RAHS Volunteer To celebrate Women’s History Month in 2020, the Royal Australian Historical Society will continue our work from last year to highlight Australian women that have contributed to our history in various and meaningful ways. You can browse the women featured on our webpage, Women’s History Month. In 1927, popular women’s magazine Woman’s World published a profile on an emerging young female sculptor. “She is such a little bit of a thing,” they reported, “that … Read More

Dame Roma Mitchell (1913-2000)

Roma Mitchell wearing the robes and full bottomed wig of a Justice of the Supreme Court of South Australia, 1965 [Image courtesy National Archives of Australia, A1200, L52938]

Written by Elizabeth Heffernan, RAHS Volunteer To celebrate Women’s History Month in 2020, the Royal Australian Historical Society will continue our work from last year to highlight Australian women that have contributed to our history in various and meaningful ways. You can browse the women featured on our webpage, Women’s History Month. As the country’s first female Queen’s Counsel, Supreme Court judge, human rights commissioner, university chancellor and state governor, it is no wonder Dame Roma Mitchell is commonly known … Read More