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Using Criminal Records as Sources of History

May 15 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

$32 – $35

This event is in partnership with WEA Sydney 

Supreme Court Building Sydney c.1900 [Image courtesy NSW State Archives]

Supreme Court Building Sydney c.1900 [Image courtesy NSW State Archives]

There is continuing fascination with crime – true crime or fictional accounts of “murder most foul”. The focus of this session will be on how the various nineteenth and early-twentieth century criminal records available in NSW, can be used by historians and writers for research into past crimes or ones that only exist in the writer’s imagination. Join archivist and professional historian Christine Yeats as she discusses some of these key records, including material at the State Archives, newspaper accounts and other related records. Christine will draw on examples from historical research to demonstrate how these records have been used.

About the speaker: Christine Yeats is the President of the Royal Australian Historical Society, President of the National Council of the Independent Scholars Association of Australia (ISAA) and the Chair of the NSW Chapter of ISAA. In addition, Christine convenes the Assessment Sub-Committee of the UNESCO Australian Memory of the World Register.

An archivist by profession, Christine is a researcher and professional historian with a particular interest in Australia’s colonial history. Her current research projects include Australia’s Romani, colonial women silk growers and the botanist Sarah Hynes.

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Details

Date:
May 15
Time:
11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Cost:
$32 – $35
Website:
https://www.weasydney.com.au/course/UCRSH

Organiser

WEA
Phone:
(02) 9264 2781
Website:
https://www.weasydney.com.au

Venue

History House
133 Macquarie Street
Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia
+ Google Map
Phone:
(02) 9247 8001
Website:
www.rahs.org.au

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